#OfficeVHortiCulture; who is happiest going into work on the most miserable day of the year?

Friday 18 January 2013

The Royal Horticultural Society (RHS) is launching a social media campaign, Office Culture versus Horticulture on the most miserable day of the year, ‘Blue Monday’, on 21 January 2013 to share the joys of horticultural careers. Recent research by City & Guilds found Gardeners and Florists to be the happiest workers in the UK*.

The City & Guilds research found that 80% of florists and gardeners feel recognised and appreciated, 89% feel their work is worthwhile and useful and 87% are happy in their careers. Yet a survey* commissioned by the RHS of 1,000 adults found that 70% of adults didn’t have horticulture highlighted to them as an opportunity when leaving education and nearly 80% of under-25-year-olds are not interested in a career in horticulture.

Ian Le Gros, Curator at RHS Garden Hyde Hall, said: “The results of these surveys show that gardening is one of best careers in terms of job satisfaction, yet careers in horticulture are not being highlighted as great opportunities to people leaving education.”

On Blue Monday gardeners and horticulturists will tweet using #OfficeVHortiCulture and share via Facebook the favourite things about their jobs, pictures of their day and advice to people about getting into horticulture.

“Gardening is undoubtedly the best career there is. Perks include a vast scope for creativity, endless opportunities and working outside on fine summer days or crisp winter days is wonderful. You work with a subject that is massively broad and could learn a new plant and skill every day.

“Hopefully through having a bit of fun with this campaign we’ll get the attention of at least some of the 80% of 25 year olds who are not interested in a career in horticulture and inspire them to think differently.” Finishes Ian.

Visit www.growcareers.info for information about horticultural careers and tweet #OfficeVHortiCulture or visit www.facebook.com/rhshome  to join in the debate.

Get rid of the blues this Monday and visit RHS Gardens and RHS Partner Gardens across the country. Visit www.rhs.org.uk/gardens  for more information.
 

-Ends-

Notes to editors

For more information please contact Charlotte Paton in the RHS Press Office on 0207 821 3126 or charlottepaton@rhs.org.uk.

To follow Office Cultutre vs. Horticulture updates visit:
Twitter: @The_RHS and @RHSPressOffice #OfficeVHorticulture
Facebook: www.facebook.com/rhshome  

Notes to the Editor:

Footnotes

*Read the full City & Guilds’ Happiness Index 2012 at http://www.cityandguilds.com/About-Us/Broadsheet-News/November-2012/Careers-Happiness-Index-2012  
• 2200 workers surveyed
• Research found that people in skills-based, vocational jobs are:
o happier than those in professional and office-based roles
o are more proud of their work
o are more likely to say they’re doing something worthwhile and useful
• Florists and Gardeners came top of the list with a huge 87% agreeing that they were happy at work
o 89% said ‘I am working in an environment that I like and I do something worthwhile and useful’
o 87% said ‘I am doing something challenging and stimulating’
o 82% get to use their skills everyday
o 80% feel recognised and appreciated
o 73% agreed that they have a good work/life balance
o 64% get training support and development

*RHS survey of 1,000 adults, aged 18 to 56+, across the whole of the United Kingdom in March 2012, revealed:
• Nearly 70% of 18-year-olds do not think gardening is a career to be proud of.
• Almost 50% of under-25-year-olds do not think gardening is a career to be proud of.
• 79% of over 40-year-olds do think gardening is a career to be proud of.
• Almost 50% of under-25-year-olds do not think gardening is a skilled career.
• Nearly 70% of 18-year-olds think gardening should only be considered as a career if you have failed academically.
• Nearly 80% of under-25-year-olds are not interested in a career in horticulture.
• More than 40% of people cite not enough horticultural knowledge as a reason they are not interested in a career in horticulture.
• Almost 25% say not knowing enough about careers in horticulture is why they are not interested in a career in horticulture.
• 70% of all adults questioned said horticulture/gardening was not highlighted to them as an opportunity by their careers advisor or teacher when leaving education.

 

About GROW Careers
Grow is an initiative set up by a group of influential organisations within the horticulture industry to inform people about horticultural careers and the range of fantastic opportunities it has to offer. Visit www.growcareers.info.  

About the RHS
The Royal Horticultural Society is the UK’s foremost gardening charity, helping and inspiring millions of people to garden. We do this at our gardens and shows and through our scientific research, publications, libraries and our education and community programmes. We are entirely funded by our members, visitors and supporters.

RHS membership is for anyone with an interest in gardening. Support the RHS and secure a healthy future for gardening. For more information call: 0845 130 4646, or visit www.rhs.org.uk/join

RHS Registered Charity No. 222879/SC038262
 

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About the RHS

The RHS believes that gardening improves the quality of life and that everyone should have access to great garden experiences. As a charity we help to bring gardening into people's lives and support gardeners of all levels and abilities; whether they are expert horticulturists or children who are planting seeds for the very first time.

RHS membership is for anyone with an interest in gardening. Support the RHS and secure a healthy future for gardening. For more information call: 0845 130 4646, or visit www.rhs.org.uk

RHS Registered Charity No. 222879/SC038262